• Tezuka Architects's new installation—run run run—offers a space for play, tactile experience, and spatial exploration in the Heinz Architectural Center. The space is full of balloons and a soft mat, surrounded by large projections of Tezuka's Fuji Kindergarten project (2007). Photo: Renee Rosensteel
  • Tezuka Architects's new installation—run run run—offers a space for play, tactile experience, and spatial exploration in the Heinz Architectural Center. The space is full of balloons and a soft mat, surrounded by large projections of Tezuka's Fuji Kindergarten project (2007). Photo: Renee Rosensteel
  • Tezuka Architects's new installation—run run run—offers a space for play, tactile experience, and spatial exploration in the Heinz Architectural Center. The space is full of balloons and a soft mat, surrounded by large projections of Tezuka's Fuji Kindergarten project (2007). Photo: Renee Rosensteel
  • Tezuka Architects's new installation—run run run—offers a space for play, tactile experience, and spatial exploration in the Heinz Architectural Center. The space is full of balloons and a soft mat, surrounded by large projections of Tezuka's Fuji Kindergarten project (2007). Photo: Renee Rosensteel
  • Tezuka Architects's new installation—run run run—offers a space for play, tactile experience, and spatial exploration in the Heinz Architectural Center. The space is full of balloons and a soft mat, surrounded by large projections of Tezuka's Fuji Kindergarten project (2007). Photo: Greenhouse Media
  • Tezuka Architects's new installation—run run run—offers a space for play, tactile experience, and spatial exploration in the Heinz Architectural Center. The space is full of balloons and a soft mat, surrounded by large projections of Tezuka's Fuji Kindergarten project (2007). Photo: Greenhouse Media
  • Tezuka Architects's new installation—run run run—offers a space for play, tactile experience, and spatial exploration in the Heinz Architectural Center. The space is full of balloons and a soft mat, surrounded by large projections of Tezuka's Fuji Kindergarten project (2007). Photo: Greenhouse Media
  • Tezuka Architects's new installation—run run run—offers a space for play, tactile experience, and spatial exploration in the Heinz Architectural Center. The space is full of balloons and a soft mat, surrounded by large projections of Tezuka's Fuji Kindergarten project (2007). Photo: Greenhouse Media
  • Tezuka Architects's new installation—run run run—offers a space for play, tactile experience, and spatial exploration in the Heinz Architectural Center. The space is full of balloons and a soft mat, surrounded by large projections of Tezuka's Fuji Kindergarten project (2007). Photo: Greenhouse Media

Heinz Architectural Center

The playground is a hidden place, seeming to have little interest for artists, designers, and architects today. Yet it is, just like the museum, a place where opinions about education, exploration, aesthetics, and the public space abound. Playgrounds are public arenas where children can gather, socialize, play freely and imaginatively—and have fun. They are among the few remaining places within the city for non-purposive, spontaneous, and creative activity, for exciting physical challenge and discovery. Yet most playgrounds today are highly standardized and sanitized. A change is needed, but, as history shows, it is only possible if we engage in the revitalization not only of the playground but of the public space in general.

The Playground Project features playground designs by Group Ludic, Niki de Saint Phalle, Aldo van Eyck, Mitsuru Senda, Isamu Noguchi, and others.

The Playground Project presents some of the most outstanding and influential playgrounds from Europe, the United States, and Japan from the mid-to-late 20th century in order to prompt a reconsideration of our own time and the way we approach childhood, risk, public space, and education. The project also puts the concept of play into the foreground as an important way of thinking, one that has influenced the development of the 2013 Carnegie International. One outcome is the addition of a Lozziwurm, a play sculpture designed in 1972, in front of the museum.

The Playground Project joins the 2013 Carnegie International with the addition of two installations: a pioneering new project by Tezuka Architects and a road movie revolving around playgrounds by contemporary artists Ei Arakawa and Henning Bohl

Read about The Playground Project in the New York Times.

The Playground Project is guest curated by Gabriela Burkhalter

Learn more about the Heinz Architectural Center.

The Lozziwurm is now open!

On April 27, 2013, the Lozziwurm—a colorful, twisting, tubular play sculpture designed by Yvan Pestalozzi in 1972—was inaugurated at Carnegie Museum of Art. This new public space explores play as the foundation of thinking, making, and experimentation, a key animating concept of the 2013 Carnegie International

Cost: FREE!
Hours: The Lozziwurm is open whenever the museum is open (until dusk).

Daniel Baumann describes the decision to build a playground as part of the 2013 Carnegie International:

See some Lozziwurm photos on our blog.

Read the Lozziwurm press release.